The Critical Thinking Rubric

1) Identifies and summarizes the problem/question at issue (and/or the source's position).

Limited Development

Substantially Developed

Does not identify and summarize the problem, is confused or identifies a different and inappropriate problem.

Identifies the main problem and subsidiary, embedded, or implicit aspects of the problem, and identifies them clearly, addressing their relationships to each other.

Does not identify or is confused by the issue, or represents the issue inaccurately.

Identifies not only the basics of the issue, but recognizes nuances of the issue.

2) Identifies and presents the STUDENT'S OWN perspective and position as it is important to the analysis of the issue.

Limited Development

Substantially Developed

Addresses a single source or view of the argument and fails to clarify the established or presented position relative to one's own. Fails to establish other critical distinctions.

Identifies, appropriately, one's own position on the issue, drawing support from experience, and information not available from assigned sources.

3) Identifies and considers OTHER salient perspectives and positions that are important to the analysis of the issue.

Limited Development

Substantially Developed

Deals only with a single perspective and fails to discuss other possible perspectives, especially those salient to the issue.

Addresses perspectives noted previously, and additional diverse perspectives drawn from outside information.

4) Identifies and assesses the key assumptions.

Limited Development

Substantially Developed

Does not surface the assumptions and ethical issues that underlie the issue, or does so superficially.

Identifies and questions the validity of the assumptions and addresses the ethical dimensions that underlie the issue.

5) Identifies and assesses the quality of supporting data/evidence and provides additional data/evidence related to the issue.

Limited Development

Substantially Developed

Merely repeats information provided, taking it as truth, or denies evidence without adequate justification. Confuses associations and correlations with cause and effect.

Examines the evidence and source of evidence; questions its accuracy, precision, relevance, completeness.
Observes cause and effect and addresses existing or potential consequences.

Does not distinguish between fact, opinion, and value judgments.

Clearly distinguishes between fact, opinion, & acknowledges value judgments.

 

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